Tani Tabbal Trio, May 22, 8 PM, Live Stream

The Tani Tabbal Trio, will perform livestream on Saturday, May 22, 8 PM from Green Kill on Youtube.

The Tani Tabbal Trio, Tani Tabbal on drums, Adam Siegel on Alto Sax and Michael Bisio on bass will perform livestream on Saturday, May 22, 8 PM from Green Kill on Youtube.

To access the event, please go here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tani-tabbal-trio-may-22-8-pm-live-stream-tickets-153501925391


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Tani Tabbal Trio

Raindrops on a window move with glacial slowness until two or three converge, whereupon they race as one with extraordinary velocity. This trio is like that. When the music converges, all sense of self is lost in the exhilarating rush of collective music-making: a spiral of prodding, colouring and answering each other. Drummer Tani Tabbal’s background with the mystical Sun Ra and the great saxophonist/composer Roscoe Mitchell has honed his instincts for finding the profoundest way to play a groove: part heart, soul and feel; part a matter of meticulously layering sounds around the kit. Bassist Michael Bissio shares this instinct, and he and Tabbal pen compositions that allow it to flourish, while on the title track they can also deliver rhythmic matter as ephemeral as the wind passing through a copse of trees. The trio’s third member is alto saxophonist Adam Siegel, who improvises with a keen sense of contributing just a third of the story, rather than dominating it, but can rise up to match the most volcanic titans on his instrument when the music demands. He also has a lighter, more aerated sound that comes out on Bisio’s Ornette Coleman tribute, Oh See OC Revisited

—John Shand

https://www.smh.com.au/culture/music/music-reviews-cecilia-bartoli-london-grammar-cory-hanson-and-more-20210419-p57kdb.html


Tani Tabbal

Veteran jazz drummer Tani Tabbal has worked with everyone from Roscoe Mitchell to Geri Allen, James Carter to Cassandra Wilson. He is equally at home playing free as the breeze and when ordered to lock down a strict groove. There’s a suppleness to the way he makes the sticks move – they kiss at the drums, he dabs and brushes at the skins like a painter approaching a fresh canvas. Here he leads a trio that features another veteran in bassist, Michael Bisio (Matthew Shipp Duo/Trio) and younger head on the alto sax, Adam Siegel.

https://offthetracks.co.nz/tani-tabbal-trio-now-then/

Raindrops on a window move with glacial slowness until two or three converge, whereupon they race as one with extraordinary velocity. This trio is like that. When the music converges, all sense of self is lost in the exhilarating rush of collective music-making: a spiral of prodding, colouring and answering each other. Drummer Tani Tabbal’s background with the mystical Sun Ra and the great saxophonist/composer Roscoe Mitchell has honed his instincts for finding the profoundest way to play a groove: part heart, soul and feel; part a matter of meticulously layering sounds around the kit. Bassist Michael Bissio shares this instinct, and he and Tabbal pen compositions that allow it to flourish, while on the title track they can also deliver rhythmic matter as ephemeral as the wind passing through a copse of trees. The trio’s third member is alto saxophonist Adam Siegel, who improvises with a keen sense of contributing just a third of the story, rather than dominating it, but can rise up to match the most volcanic titans on his instrument when the music demands. He also has a lighter, more aerated sound that comes out on Bisio’s Ornette Coleman tribute, Oh See OC Revisited. 

— John Shand, Sydney Morning Herald          

https://www.smh.com.au/culture/music/music-reviews-cecilia-bartoli-london-grammar-cory-hanson-and-more-20210419-p57kdb.html                                                                                                                                                                                                   

“Here and elsewhere, the musicians shift between leading and supporting with an ease that testifies to the chemistry honed on the bandstand.”

—Bill Meyer , Downbeat

https://downbeat.com/digitaledition/2021/DB21_01_test/single_page_view/50.html

“Time is a given for the Woodstock-based composer/percussionist. He screams time, even when drumming up clatter and chaos. On Now Then, the latest from his trio, he joins forces once more with bassist Michael Bisio and alto saxman Adam Siegel. Wow! Listening is an adventure. Drink deep. The storm of the title track gives way, during "Midway Open," to an arco/alto conversation between Bisio and Siegel, all breath and bow, nodding heads and furtive glances. Magic. Bisio's "Sun History Ra Mystery" shimmers over an ostinato thrum, Siegel floating in like a haint, lingering in shadows. The piece "r. henri," also from Bisio's strong pen, hums with the art spirit, urging contemplation. Be the adventure. This music, recorded on a single day in December 2019, is alive to all possibilities. Now then!”

—Michael Eck, Chronogram

https://www.chronogram.com/hudsonvalley/tani-tabbal-trio-now-then/Content?oid=12688503

"Transcending time and trends, Now Then is an exceptional document of interactive free improvisation by three musicians working together as one."

–Troy Collins, Point of Departure 

http://www.pointofdeparture.org/PoD73/PoD73MoreMoments6.html


Michael Bisio

Michael Bisio is an American jazz double bassist, composer, and bandleader. Since 2009 he has been the bassist for the Matthew Shipp Trio.

Bisio appears on over 100 CDs, leading on 12 CDs and co-leading on another dozen.

Bisio has composed over one hundred works which have been performed in clubs, concert venues, and festivals. They have been broadcast over assorted media. Most have been recorded; some were composed for films and theater, and one found was used in animation.

In his book Jackson Street After Hours, music critic Paul de Barros called Bisio one of the heirs to Seattle's earthy yet innovative tradition and marked his compositional style as "a spare, bluesy sound, the sweet- and-sour timbres favored by Charles Mingus.

Bisio composed the music for Karl Krogstad's film Strings (1985). Beat Angel (2004), a film by Randy Allred with Vincent Balestri, features Bisio's compositions and improvisations. In his film Time & Object, animator Bernard Roddy uses "Something Different" from Zebulon as the score. Bisio composed music for Music for American Voices: Bukowski, Micheline and the First Amendment, a play written and performed by Vincent Balestri.


Adam Siegel

Adam Siegel is an alto saxophonist with over a decade of experience as a jazz improviser. He graduated from The University of the Arts in Philadelphia, PA, where he was instructed by Philadelphia-based tenor saxophonists Ben Schachter and Chris Farr. Adam has shared the stage with such greats as Dick Oatts, Jon Gordon, Joe Magnarelli, Grant Stewart, Tani Tabbal, Jeff Coffin, Matt Mitchell, Michael Bisio, and Pete Seeger. In addition to leading his own groups, the Whisper Trio and the Adam Siegel Quartet, Adam is currently a member of the Tani Tabbal Trio, the Walter Donnaruma Group, the Dylan Perrillo Orchestra, the Sketches of Influence, and the Anwar Marshall Trio